New Mexico Department of Health
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Emerging Infections Program

Resources


Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Isolate Bank

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Isolate Bank

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Isolate Bank

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance isolate bank page on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Special Studies

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Special Studies

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Special Studies

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance special studies page on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Association Between Use of Statins and Mortality Among Patients Hospitalized With Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Virus Infections: A Multistate Study

Association Between Use of Statins and Mortality Among Patients Hospitalized With Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Virus Infections: A Multistate Study

Association Between Use of Statins and Mortality Among Patients Hospitalized With Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Virus Infections: A Multistate Study

The role of statin drugs in the reduction of serum lipids has been well documented. More recently, evidence suggesting that statins may positively affect many organ systems and disease states independent of lipid reduction has emerged. As inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, statins inhibit the synthesis of products of the mevalonate pathway, such as isoprenoids and geranyl-geranyl pyrophosphate. They have been shown to modify intercellular interactions and cellular chemotaxis of the immune system and reduce the release of cytokines and acute phase proteins. Recent review articles, evaluating mostly observational studies, suggest a potential beneficial role for statins in the treatment of sepsis and community acquired pneumonia.

Clostridium difficile Infection Information

Clostridium difficile Infection Information

Clostridium difficile Infection Information

People getting medical care can catch serious infections called health care-associated infections. While most types of are declining, one – caused by the germ C. difficile – remains at historically high levels. C. difficile causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 American deaths each year. Those most at risk are people, especially older adults, who take antibiotics and also get medical care. When a person takes antibiotics, good germs that protect against infection are destroyed for several months. During this time, patients can get sick from C. difficile picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread from a health care provider’s hands.

Estimate of Incidence Rates for Influenza-Related Hospitalizations

Estimate of Incidence Rates for Influenza-Related Hospitalizations

Estimate of Incidence Rates for Influenza-Related Hospitalizations

This website interface provides an estimate of incidence rates for influenza-related hospitalizations.

Group A Streptococcal Disease Information for Clinicians

Group A Streptococcal Disease Information for Clinicians

Group A Streptococcal Disease Information for Clinicians

Group A streptococcal diease information for clinicians including clinical features, etiologic agent, incidence, sequelae, transmission, risk groups, surveillance, and more.

Group A Streptococcus Report 2011

Group A Streptococcus Report 2011

Group A Streptococcus Report 2011

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance personnel routinely contacted all microbiology laboratories serving acute care hospitals in their area to identify cases. Standardized case report forms that include information on demographic characteristics, clinical syndrome, and outcome of illness were completed for each identified case. Strains were emmtyped at the Centers for Disease Control. Regular laboratory audits assessed completeness of active surveillance and detected additional cases.

Group B Streptococcus

Group B Streptococcus

Group B Streptococcus

This Center for Disease Control and Prevention page is an overview of Group B Streptococcus, which is a type of bacteria that causes illness in people of all ages. It is the most common cause of some life-threatening infections in newborns, but it can be prevented.

Group B Streptococcus Report 2011

Group B Streptococcus Report 2011

Group B Streptococcus Report 2011

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance personnel routinely contacted all microbiology laboratories serving acute care hospitals in their area to identify cases. Standardized case report forms that include information on demographic characteristics, clinical syndrome, and outcome of illness were completed for each identified case. Regular laboratory audits assessed completeness of active surveillance and detected additional cases.

Guidelines for the Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease 2010

Guidelines for the Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease 2010

Guidelines for the Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease 2010

Revised Guidelines for the Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease were published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on November 19, 2010. These 2010 guidelines were developed using an evidence-based approach in collaboration with several professional associations.

Guillain-Barré Syndrome During the 2009–2010 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Population-based Surveillance Among 45 Million Americans

Guillain-Barré Syndrome During the 2009–2010 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Population-based Surveillance Among 45 Million Americans

Guillain-Barré Syndrome During the 2009–2010 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Population-based Surveillance Among 45 Million Americans

Because of widespread distribution of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine (pH1N1 vaccine) and the prior association between Guillain-Barre´ syndrome (GBS) and the 1976 H1N1 influenza vaccine, enhanced surveillance was implemented to estimate the magnitude of any increased GBS risk following administration of pH1N1 vaccine. The authors conducted active, population-based surveillance for incident cases of GBS among 45 million persons residing at 10 Emerging Infections Program sites during October 2009–May 2010; GBS was defined according to published criteria.

Haemophilus influenzae Disease Information for Clinicians

Haemophilus influenzae Disease Information for Clinicians

Haemophilus influenzae Disease Information for Clinicians

Haemophilus influenzae diease information for clinicians including clinical features, sequelae, etiologic agent, transmission, risk groups, incidence, trends, and more.

Haemophilus influenzae Type B Information

Haemophilus influenzae Type B Information

Haemophilus influenzae Type B Information

Haemophilus influenzae is a cause of bacterial infections that are often severe, particularly among infants. It was first described by Pfeiffer in 1892. During an outbreak of influenza he found the bacteria in sputum of patients and proposed a causal association between this bacterium and the clinical syndrome known as influenza. The organism was given the name Haemophilus by Winslow, et al. in 1920. It was not until 1933 that Smith, et al. established that influenza was caused by a virus and that H. influenzae was a cause of secondary infection.

Influenza Testing and Antiviral Prescribing Practices Among Emergency Department Clinicians in 9 States During the 2006 to 2007 Influenza Season

Influenza Testing and Antiviral Prescribing Practices Among Emergency Department Clinicians in 9 States During the 2006 to 2007 Influenza Season

Influenza Testing and Antiviral Prescribing Practices Among Emergency Department Clinicians in 9 States During the 2006 to 2007 Influenza Season

Influenza causes significant widespread illness each year. Emergency department clinicians are often first-line providers to evaluate and make treatment decisions for patients presenting with influenza. We sought to better understand emergency department clinician testing and treatment practices in the Emerging Infections Program Network, a federal, state, and academic collaboration that conducts active surveillance for influenza-associated hospitalizations.

Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever Information

Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever Information

Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever Information

Legionellosis is a respiratory disease caused by Legionella bacteria. Sometimes the bacteria infect the lungs and cause pneumonia — if so, it is called Legionnaires' disease. The bacteria can also cause a less serious infection that seems more like a mild case of the flu. That form of legionellosis is commonly called Pontiac fever.

Meningococcal Disease Prevention and Control

Meningococcal Disease Prevention and Control

Meningococcal Disease Prevention and Control

Neisseria meningitidis has become a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the United States after dramatic reductions in the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b infections have been achieved as a result of using conjugate vaccines.

Meningococcal Vaccine Information Statement

Meningococcal Vaccine Information Statement

Meningococcal Vaccine Information Statement

Meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial illness. It is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children 2 through 18 years old in the United States. Meningitis is an infection of the covering of the brain and the spinal cord. Meningococcal disease also causes blood infections.

Progress Toward Elimination of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Among Infants & Children in the US 1998-2000

Progress Toward Elimination of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Among Infants & Children in the US 1998-2000

Progress Toward Elimination of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Among Infants & Children in the US 1998-2000

Haemophilus influenzae type b was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and a major cause of other serious invasive diseases among children aged <5 years in the United States before Hib conjugate vaccines became available in 1988.

Retail Meat Report 2010

Retail Meat Report 2010

Retail Meat Report 2010

National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System retail meat report for 2010.