NMDOH Logo
Home Resources Department of Health
RSS Feed Icon

Department of Health Resources

Links to other websites directly operated by the New Mexico Department of Health.

Community Health Assessment

Adults Lacking Basic Prose Literacy Skills

Adults Lacking Basic Prose Literacy Skills

Adults Lacking Basic Prose Literacy Skills

Adults need strong literacy skills to get good jobs, stay healthy, be active in their communities, avoid human rights abuse, avoid crime, and to raise children who have strong literacy skills. The employees most in demand in the US have at least a two-year college degree. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report (2003), 75 percent of America's state prison inmates did not complete high school. Literacy begins when parents read to their children and encourage their children to read. Parents who are poor readers don't read as often to their children. When young children are not read to, they enter school less prepared for learning to read than other children.

American Community Survey Queries

American Community Survey Queries

American Community Survey Queries

Allows queries of US census bureau data by New Mexico county, small area and census tract.

Bachelor's Degree or Higher in New Mexico

Bachelor's Degree or Higher in New Mexico

Bachelor's Degree or Higher in New Mexico

Higher adult education levels are associated with greater earning potential, higher life expectancy, and increased social involvement. There is a relationship between more education and better mental well-being and over-all health. People having higher education benefits society as a whole through: civic engagement, interest in societal issues, and stronger interpersonal connections.

Birth & Death Certificate Data Queries by the Social Determinants of Health

Birth & Death Certificate Data Queries by the Social Determinants of Health

Birth & Death Certificate Data Queries by the Social Determinants of Health

This query allows users to stratify birth outcomes by census tract level measures of the social determinants of health. The use of sociodemographic variables for routine analysis of public health data is currently recommended by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.

Birth Mothers' Who Attained a High School Degree or Higher

Birth Mothers' Who Attained a High School Degree or Higher

Birth Mothers' Who Attained a High School Degree or Higher

A mother's education level affects decisions directly influencing her and her children's health. Worldwide, higher maternal education is linked to decreases in low birth weight, infant mortality, and maternal mortality. Level of education is related to children's physical health and academic outcomes, both as children and adults. Maternal education is associated with children's nutritional status and potential obesity. Children of mothers with a high school diploma or less have a higher likelihood of adolescent obesity. Higher education levels are associated with maternal reproductive decisions including contraceptive use, having fewer children, and a later age of marriage.

Children Under Age 18 Living in Poverty

Children Under Age 18 Living in Poverty

Children Under Age 18 Living in Poverty

Poverty in the early years of a child's life, more than at any other time, has especially harmful effects on continuing healthy development and well-being, including developmental delays and infant mortality. Well-being in later childhood, such as teen pregnancy, substance abuse, and educational attainment, are also influenced by early childhood poverty. Children born into poverty are less likely to have regular health care, proper nutrition, and opportunities for mental stimulation and enrichment.

Children Under Age 5 Living in Poverty

Children Under Age 5 Living in Poverty

Children Under Age 5 Living in Poverty

Childhood poverty has especially harmful effects on healthy development and well-being, including developmental delays and infant mortality. Children born into poverty are less likely to have regular health care, proper nutrition, and opportunities for mental stimulation and enrichment. These factors are especially important in the very earliest years of life, because children's brain growth and skill development starts at early infancy. Studies document that children who live in low-income and under-educated families start to score lower on standardized developmental tests by as early as eighteen months of age. Such early setbacks are difficult to overcome.

Community Health Information in 5 Clicks

Community Health Information in 5 Clicks

Community Health Information in 5 Clicks

Getting to New Mexico Indicator-Based Information System community health information is easy. In fact, you can do it in five mouse clicks.

Community Snapshot Reports

Community Snapshot Reports

Community Snapshot Reports

A community profile produces a report on a set of health indicators for a given community. You may choose the community, and the set of indicators and the additional page content to be viewed for the selected community.

Educational Attainment in New Mexico

Educational Attainment in New Mexico

Educational Attainment in New Mexico

A good education leads to good health in several ways. First, the more schooling people have, the more money they earn which enables them to purchase better housing in safer neighborhoods, healthier food, better medical care and health insurance, and more education. Each of these factors is associated with improved health. Each one allows individuals to move up the occupational and income ladder, giving them more prestige and power, both of which are associated with better health. High school completion is also the gateway into college, which offers even greater benefits than high school alone. Second, education facilitates healthier behavior choices by offering learners access to health information and tools to acquire help and resources, such as smoking cessation programs. Third, education helps people to acquire social support, strengthen social networks, and mitigate social stressors. The more education people have the more social support they have. Education helps people to gain a sense of control over their lives, an outcome associated with better health.

English Not Not Spoken at Home

English Not Not Spoken at Home

English Not Not Spoken at Home

Speaking another language can influence how a person is able to interact with others and participate in educational and other opportunities. Knowing the proportion of people who might need help in understanding English can inform policies, programs and services. Addressing language barriers can help eliminate health disparities by removing language related barriers to healthcare access.

Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Program Eligibility

Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Program Eligibility

Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Program Eligibility

The National School Lunch Program provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to school children. Participation in the free and reduced price lunch program can reduce childhood food insecurity and allow children to have access to more nutritious foods. Food insecurity and related under-nutrition can negatively impact children's development and school performance. Having adequate nutrition promotes growth and development and reduces chronic disease risk.

Indicator Report Aplhabetical Index

Indicator Report Aplhabetical Index

Indicator Report Aplhabetical Index

This is an alphabetical listing of all indicator reports on the New Mexico Indicator-Based Information System website.

Median Household Income

Median Household Income

Median Household Income

Income is strongly related to health status. Low-income persons tend to have poorer health status, in part because they cannot always afford good health care. However, some people have low income levels because chronic mental or physical illness limits their ability to complete educational goals and/or earn a good income.

New Mexico Population Estimates Data Query

New Mexico Population Estimates Data Query

New Mexico Population Estimates Data Query

The population data in this IBIS-Q query module were produced by the University of New Mexico Geospatial and Population Studies program and are considered the most accurate available for New Mexico. for New Mexico. They are the official estimates used in the New Mexico Department of Health.

Persons Living in Poverty

Persons Living in Poverty

Persons Living in Poverty

Poverty takes into account both income and family size, and has both immediate and long-lasting effects on health. Income provides an assessment of the financial resources available to individual persons or families for basic necessities to maintain or improve their well-being. Persons living in poverty are worse off than persons in more affluent households for many of the indicators tracked by the New Mexico Department of Health.

Query System Contents & Usage

Query System Contents & Usage

Query System Contents & Usage

The New Mexico Indicator-Based Information System provides a simple-to-use query system interface that allows a user to step through data selection options and perform custom queries of New Mexico's public health databases.

School-aged Children Age 5-17 Living in Poverty

School-aged Children Age 5-17 Living in Poverty

School-aged Children Age 5-17 Living in Poverty

In 2013, approximately 103,800 New Mexico school-aged children, 5 to 17 years old, were in families living in poverty. Research suggests that living in poverty during early childhood is associated with lower than average academic performance that begins in kindergarten and extends through elementary and high school. Living in poverty during early childhood is associated with lower than average rates of school completion.

Social Determinants of Health Topics

Social Determinants of Health Topics

Social Determinants of Health Topics

Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Resources that enhance quality of life can have a significant influence on population health outcomes. Examples of these resources include safe and affordable housing, access to education, public safety, availability of healthy foods, local emergency/health services, and environments free of life-threatening toxins.

Unemployment in New Mexico

Unemployment in New Mexico

Unemployment in New Mexico

Household income is strongly related to health status for all persons in the household. Those living at or near the poverty level tend to have poorer health status, in part because they cannot always afford health care. Health status also depends on meeting a family's needs for adequate housing and nutrition. Lack of income may also keep children from having access to quality education, safe areas to play, and expose them to other risk factors. In addition, common reasons for unemployment include chronic mental or physical illness that limits a person's ability to work outside the home.

Young Children With Parents in the Workforce

Young Children With Parents in the Workforce

Young Children With Parents in the Workforce

Parents and families are characteristically the earliest educators of young children, and the level of parental interaction during formative years is linked to a variety of academic outcomes. However, the degree of parental involvement may be influenced by the labor-force participation of the parents, particularly in single-parent households. An increased need for quality child care is found in family settings where all parents are employed full-time.