New Mexico Department of Health
Our mission is to promote health and wellness, improve health outcomes, and assure safety net services for all people in New Mexico.

Healthy Kids New Mexico

Publications

Photo of the publication cover. Childhood Obesity Fact Sheet Healthy Kids New Mexico - Help February 13, 2017

This is a fact sheet about childhood obesity in the State of New Mexico.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of Cibola County Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

Cibola County has figured out what a small, rural community needs to do to develop a healthy environment for children and families: work together and share resources. For the Healthy Kids Healthy Cibola County Initiative, people who are focused on economic development and public health have come together to make it easier for residents to choose healthy foods and be active.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of Curry County Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

In Clovis, more than half of the elementary-school students participated in a challenge to improve their nutrition and be more active. Schools are developing edible gardens. Eleven of twelve elementary schools have salad bars, and all twelve have school yards that are open for community use outside of school hours.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of Guadalupe County Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

Katrina Velasquez is busy racking up miles. The first-grader is her family’s motivator too, pushing her parents to walk with her on their five-acre property a mile outside of Santa Rosa.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of Lake Arthur Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

In Lake Arthur, an isolated rural town of about 400 people in southeastern New Mexico, residents have to drive 25 miles to the nearest grocery store. Fresh produce is a rare commodity.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of McKinley County Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

Carol Burnett was attending a birthday party when a mother told her about her son’s daily salad report. When she comes home from work, he is so excited to tell her which kind of Burnett’s pre-packaged salads he ate at his elementary school that day.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of the Mescalero Apache Tribe Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

The rural, tribal community of Mescalero envisions multiple generations using a walking trail along the Tularosa Creek, where there will be designated fishing areas, natural playscapes for children and shady oases for adults.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of Roswell Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

One day the cafeteria floor underneath the salad bar at Pecos Elementary School was littered with vegetables. Principal Barbara Ryan warned students that she would remove the salad bar if they didn’t keep it clean.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of San Ildefonso Pueblo Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

One young mother in San Ildefonso Pueblo knew she had to do something to prevent her sons from becoming obese. She watched as Healthy Kids Healthy San Ildefonso posted trail signs and cleaned up the dirt path near her home. When the trail was ready, she began walking on it each evening with her family.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of Socorro County Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

Tom Hyden, who lives south of Socorro on a farm near San Antonio, calls himself the Tom Sawyer of the food-system movement in Socorro. “I try to convince other people how much fun it is,” Hyden said with a chuckle, referring to how the infamous character in Mark Twain’s book charms people into doing his chores.



Photo of the publication cover. Success Stories of Zuni Pueblo Healthy Kids New Mexico - Newsletter March 19, 2014

On the northwestern edge of New Mexico, Zuni Pueblo is the largest of the state’s 19 pueblos with nearly 10,000 residents. Most people live within the main village and the nearby community of Blackrock. Zuni is well-known for its rich cultural, linguistic and artistic heritage. However, because of its geographic isolation, Zuni Pueblo has faced challenges in ensuring residents access to diverse activities and healthy food options.